astrodidact:

The celebrity doctor appeared before a U.S. Senate subcommittee today, which blamed his “miracle” claims for fueling a predatory industry of supplement sellers.

photo of Dr. Mehmet Oz

Dr. Oz is having a bad day. The celebrity doctor went to Washington, D.C., today to testify before a Senate subcommittee. The…

Eye roll

"

Inmates are making a surprising array of products for small businesses. You can even find some in your local Whole Foods.

Some years back, a small Colorado goat-cheese maker called Haystack Mountain faced its version of a classic growth challenge: National demand was growing for its chèvres and other cheeses, and the company was struggling to find enough local goat farmers to produce milk. The solution came from a surprising source: Colorado Corrections Industries (CCI). Today six inmates milk 1,000 goats twice a day on a prison-run farm. After non-inmate employees cultivate the cheese at a company facility, it’s sold in Whole Foods WFM -0.36% outlets, among other stores.

Prison labor has gone artisanal. Sure, plenty of inmates still churn out government office furniture and the like, and incarcerated workers have occasionally been used by large companies since the late 1970s. Nationwide 63,032 inmates produce more than $2 billion worth of products a year, most of them sold to government entities.

"

Prison labor’s new frontier: Artisanal foods (x)

Sold at your local Whole Foods on the backs of forced labor

(via chupnaraho)

(via howtobeterrell)

girlwithalessonplan:

notentirely:

my work shoes
years ago when i got promoted into ranks of management at my university IT job, i made the very clear decision to continue, on most days, to dress the way i did as a developer. this included continuing to wear my many, assorted, colorful vans. often mismatched.
i knew at the time that this might be perceived to mean i wasn’t to be taken seriously, or that i didn’t know how to play grown-up, or that i wasn’t getting with the program.
perhaps all valid. but i felt that my effort should matter more than my shoes. i work hard and i deliver, i should be able to wear what i want. the results should speak for themselves.
naive? maybe. but when i later got promoted into the director-level ranks, i was promoted wearing my red shoes.
recently a colleague i’ve worked with for years ran into me at an event. he said, “i hope this doesn’t sound strange, but i’m really glad to see that you still wear your red shoes.” i was a bit confused and he continued, “they didn’t change you. you didn’t become one of them.”
since then i’ve thought of all the ways that my simple decision to wear what i liked had subtly influenced things around me. how it “meant” something in ways i’d not intended, but that still might be true. then this morning bombtune posted the harvard business school article, “The Manager in Red Sneakers”, and i can see that my small choice can be read as a bold statement.
a statement not intended… but still, true.
there’s a re-org happening in my department. there’s a strong possibility i may be promoted again. i started to consider if maybe i need to re-think my personal dress code. maybe i’m hurting my teams’ credibility. maybe…
but no. if they’re going to promote me, they know who i am. and i’ll be wearing my red shoes.

This speaks to me.

girlwithalessonplan:

notentirely:

my work shoes

years ago when i got promoted into ranks of management at my university IT job, i made the very clear decision to continue, on most days, to dress the way i did as a developer. this included continuing to wear my many, assorted, colorful vans. often mismatched.

i knew at the time that this might be perceived to mean i wasn’t to be taken seriously, or that i didn’t know how to play grown-up, or that i wasn’t getting with the program.

perhaps all valid. but i felt that my effort should matter more than my shoes. i work hard and i deliver, i should be able to wear what i want. the results should speak for themselves.

naive? maybe. but when i later got promoted into the director-level ranks, i was promoted wearing my red shoes.

recently a colleague i’ve worked with for years ran into me at an event. he said, “i hope this doesn’t sound strange, but i’m really glad to see that you still wear your red shoes.” i was a bit confused and he continued, “they didn’t change you. you didn’t become one of them.”

since then i’ve thought of all the ways that my simple decision to wear what i liked had subtly influenced things around me. how it “meant” something in ways i’d not intended, but that still might be true. then this morning bombtune posted the harvard business school article, “The Manager in Red Sneakers”, and i can see that my small choice can be read as a bold statement.

a statement not intended… but still, true.

there’s a re-org happening in my department. there’s a strong possibility i may be promoted again. i started to consider if maybe i need to re-think my personal dress code. maybe i’m hurting my teams’ credibility. maybe…

but no. if they’re going to promote me, they know who i am. and i’ll be wearing my red shoes.

This speaks to me.

freedomtomarry:

Reblog to celebrate this progress in all 11 Northeastern states!

freedomtomarry:

Reblog to celebrate this progress in all 11 Northeastern states!

(via thedragoninmygarage)

sumney:

zebablah:

spectaclesinscript:

stereoculturesociety:

DailyPBO: The President & The Standing Rock Sioux Reservation - June 2014
The crowd to President Obama: “We love you President Obama! You’re our hero!”
President Obama: “I love you back!”
Obama became only the fourth sitting president to visit an Indian reservation. Attending with the First Lady, it was a truly inspiring event at the Cannon Ball Pow Wow Grounds in Cannon Ball, North Dakota. The Native American community was bursting with pride over the president’s visit and when he spoke Lakota during his speech, they were completely moved. It was a wonderful day for a community that never (and I mean NEVER) gets the respect they deserve. Bravo, Mr. President.
For more reactions, check the Twitter hashtag: #PrezRezVisit

Only the fourth? Of ALL the sitting presidents that have come and gone? Dang.

the

fourth

Cute, but what is he doing for Native American communities?

(Source: chescaleigh, via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

"As the world’s largest jailer, the United States, with only 5 percent of the world’s population but 25 percent of the world’s prisoners, has increased its incarceration rate of women by 832 percent over three decades. The incarceration rate of black women in the United States has increased by 828 percent over a five year period and black women now constitute one half of the US female prison population. In Western Australia, the number of incarcerated women doubled between 1995 and 2001, with Indigenous women comprising 54 percent of the female prisoner population although constituting only 2 percent of the state’s population. In Canada, the representation of Indigenous women in prisons has increased nearly 90 percent over the past decade and has been declared “nothing short of a crisis”"

— Harsha Walia, Undoing Border Imperialism (via lehaaz)

(via sumney)

sinidentidades:

Marissa Alexander’s Retrial Postponed to December
Marissa Alexander’s retrial has been postponed until December 1 due to questions about whether a new Florida bill can be used retroactively in her case. She originally faced retrial on July 28. 
Alexander, 33, was convicted of aggravated assault after firing a warning shot during a fight with her abusive husband. But she was released on bond last November after an appeals court ruled in September that the jury in her trial was given flawed instructions. She was originally sentenced to 20 years; if convicted in a retrial, Alexander faces up to 60 years in prison.
Judge James Daniel was set to determine this morning if Alexander was eligible for a Stand Your Ground hearing—which was denied to her previously. Florida lawmakers passed a Warning Shot Bill in March that Alexander’s legal team says can protect her, but Governor Rick Scott has yet to sign it into law. Because of that pending law, attorneys on both sides asked for an extension. A decision on whether Alexander can get a Stand Your Ground hearing is now postponed.
One of Marissa Alexander’s most ardent supporters, Mariame Kaba, published an anthology whose proceeds will benefit the Alexander’s legal defense. “No Selves to Defend” is available, and features writing and artwork that “locates Marissa’s case within a historical context that criminalizes and punishes women (particularly Black women) for self-defense.” Only 125 copies of the anthology are available for purchase for $50—and there will be no reprints. 

sinidentidades:

Marissa Alexander’s Retrial Postponed to December

Marissa Alexander’s retrial has been postponed until December 1 due to questions about whether a new Florida bill can be used retroactively in her case. She originally faced retrial on July 28. 

Alexander, 33, was convicted of aggravated assault after firing a warning shot during a fight with her abusive husband. But she was released on bond last November after an appeals court ruled in September that the jury in her trial was given flawed instructions. She was originally sentenced to 20 years; if convicted in a retrial, Alexander faces up to 60 years in prison.

Judge James Daniel was set to determine this morning if Alexander was eligible for a Stand Your Ground hearing—which was denied to her previously. Florida lawmakers passed a Warning Shot Bill in March that Alexander’s legal team says can protect her, but Governor Rick Scott has yet to sign it into law. Because of that pending law, attorneys on both sides asked for an extension. A decision on whether Alexander can get a Stand Your Ground hearing is now postponed.

One of Marissa Alexander’s most ardent supporters, Mariame Kaba, published an anthology whose proceeds will benefit the Alexander’s legal defense. “No Selves to Defend” is available, and features writing and artwork that “locates Marissa’s case within a historical context that criminalizes and punishes women (particularly Black women) for self-defense.” Only 125 copies of the anthology are available for purchase for $50—and there will be no reprints. 

(via sumney)

pickledpennies:

clype:

have you noticed that when someone goes ‘i was bitten by a dog once and now I’m kinda wary around them’ most people are like ‘aw, I understand’ but if a woman says she’s been raped/abused by men in the past and is now scared of them she gets told she’s paranoid and needs to get over it?

I noticed that.

have you noticed that when a dog bites a person, it gets put down

(via sumney)

spikeghost:

thepacificrimjob:

thebookskeeper:

So a friend of mine had the misfortune of dealing with rape culture from a police officer. She gave me the permission to post this on Tumblr so the name of this officer and her story can spread.

So let’s be serious for a second guys please -

Last night around 2 a.m. my friends and I decided to take a drive around Hutchinson island, and when upon returning into Sewall’s Point we made a stop underneath the causeway. We decided to stop, listen to music, and stand outside the car. Not intoxicated, not under any substance abuse, and not in the possession of any weapons - we were having clean wholesome dumb teenage fun. Without doing anything incriminating it still was unfortunately interrupted by Officer Scott Donlon, when he drove around the causeway and approached us with his lights on. We turned down the music and waited for him to approach us outside my friends car. The lights almost made it impossible for us to see his face or communicate with him without holding my arm in front of my face.

He walks up to us and says,

"I sure as hell can’t wait to hear this story."

I took the liberty to talk for my friends, because they were visibly intimidated and frightened by this officer.

I responded,

"Honestly officer, we were on our way to the beach when we decided that it was probably too late and unsafe. We decided on our drive back to stop here and enjoy ourselves. We are good people. None of us are under the influence or intoxicated we are more than willing to take a breathalyzer if you have any suspicion that we are."

That’s when he made the most disturbing comment of all,

"Yeah because running around in your underwear -"

I couldn’t believe it, he decided that my outfit of choice constituted as underwear to him. My floral top that showed my mid-drift and my high-waisted shorts was something he was going to demean and call “underwear”?

I tried my hardest not to be rude to him, but I responded with,

"That’s extremely rude and offensive sir. I don’t think my outfit should be considered underwear."

He continued to walk around my friends car trying to be intimidating and aggressive, so I spoke again:

"Sir, are you detaining us?"

Which he responded, “Yes.”

So I said, “What for?”

"For wearing underwear."

I was fuming. I was disgusted. I was baffled. I couldn’t believe that right before my very eyes rape culture was brought to light by this officer.

Again everyone - Scott Donlon, Officer of Sewall’s Point, who’s name I asked for because I was not going to let this white old privileged male think he could demean the four of us.

Luckily another officer, rolled up to us in the middle of this, he who was much kinder and diffused the situation by saying,

"Do not try him, you need to just give him respect. You could make things so much worse for yourself."

I wanted to say,

"What!? Excuse me? It’s your job to protect us, not to make us feel like our lives are threatened because he decided that he wants to be intimidating?"

Instead I said to the other officer,

"Officer, I mean no offense, and I’m sorry if I upset him, but he told us we were being detained for wearing underwear. Look at the four of us, we may be showing our stomachs, but we’re fully clothed and that’s by no means okay."

He responded,

"Well if he says you’re being detained. You’re being detained."

We were never detained.

It was all an intimidation tactic, and because of course it wasn’t worth the fight, I apologized for MY behavior and for disrespecting HIM. I let him continue to say I was running around in my “underwear.” I continued to let him say, “If I was in a bad mood tonight, I could have got you in so much more trouble.” I continued to let him discriminate my age by saying “I don’t need some 19 year old giving me attitude thinking she knows the law better than me.” I continued to let him completely dominate the situation and degrade us.

I’m not okay with this, I’m not okay with another officer fluffing his ego because he has some fucked up authoritative mentality.

Below I’ll add the photo of the outfit I was wearing, you guys let me know if I missed out on the memo of what defines underwear now.

If you actually took the time to go through my terrible grammar and read all of this ridiculous nonsense - thank you so much thank you thankyoouuu.

If you add his name ( Scott Donlon ) and people reblog with his name then it will show up in google search results as each person reblogging it is technically posting his name with the story on a separate webpage

Scott Donlon is gross

(Source: sandyfeathers, via seriouslyamerica)

thestraggletag:

thestraggletag:

submariet:

VAN EYCK

I lost it at the end.

Okay, I had to check out the Van Eyck thing. I was a bit in denial because, come on, every single person can’t look like President Putin!

There are no words to describe how wrong I was.

(Source: cheekygeekymonkey, via becauseforoncethisisme)

aspergersissues:


this is important

This is spot on.

aspergersissues:

this is important

This is spot on.

fieldnotesonallistics:

A very famous allism researcher once noted that the primary difference between normal people and allistics is that, while normal people are self-directed, allistics are self-absorbed. I didn’t understand that today until I saw how Alia, our eight-year-old allistic daughter, behaved at her…

geardrops:

swanjolras:

out of all the aspects of millennial-bashing, i think the one that most confuses me is the “millennials all got trophies as a kid, so now they’re all self-centered narcissists” theory

like— kids are pretty smart, y’all. they can see that every kid on the team…